KILLSWITCH ENGAGE & CLUTCH

WAAF Presents

KILLSWITCH ENGAGE & CLUTCH

All That Remains, Cro-Mags JM, Led To Believe

Sun, August 4, 2019

Doors: 3:00 pm / Show: 4:00 pm

Palladium

$40 - $249

This event is all ages

Killswitch Engage
Killswitch Engage
Metalcore band from Massachusetts that formed in 1999.

Former touring members:
Patrick Lachman – guitars (2007)
Josh Mihlek – guitars (2007)
Peter Wichers – guitars (2007)
Phil Labonte – lead vocals (Feb–Mar 2010)
Jesse Leach – lead vocals (March 2010)
Clutch
Clutch
With the release of their highly anticipated 12th studio album, the gloriously titled “Book of Bad Decisions”, it would be easy to suggest that legendary Maryland rockers Clutch have made their finest record to date. This may even be true. You see, the thing about Clutch is that ever since their 1993 debut Transnational Speedway League they've been in the business of writing stone cold classics, and even the most rabid fan would have trouble picking just one. “Book of Bad Decisions” won't make that task any easier. Rest assured, it's another classic.

Recorded over three weeks at Sputnik Studios in Nashville, “Book of Bad Decisions” was produced by four-time Grammy winner Vance Powell (Seasick Steve, The White Stripes, Arctic Monkeys, etc.), a man who apparently knows that a one degree angle change in microphones makes a difference to how an instrument sounds. Interestingly, his name first came to the band's attention via country star Chris Stapleton.

“It started with my brother-in-law, who's a huge Chris Stapleton fan,” says drummer Jean-Paul Gaster. “He and I would listen to The Traveller quite a bit, and one thing that stood out was that it didn't sound like any other country record that I'd heard. Shortly after that I was on Spotify, and a song by The Dead Weather came up. It just blew me away and I could tell that whoever produced that record was doing things a different way. I looked it up and there was Vance Powell's name again, so something was telling us that this is a guy we should reach out to.”

“Even though Chris Stapleton does music that's not too much like our own, the sonics of the record are pretty great,” says frontman Neil Fallon. “He has a very different approach to recording; he comes from the school of live recording and engineering, and the songs, on tape, are not gonna sound that much different from what we do live.”

No stranger to the road, Powell spent three days on tour with the band in order to get a feel for what they do best, watching first from the front of house and then from the stage, checking out the live sound and how Clutch connect with their audience.

“I never go into a record having an idea of how it's gonna sound,” he says. “But after hearing them live, I had an idea of how they could sound. I'm a big live recording fan, so I like when bands play together and I didn't wanna get into that manufacturing a record concept. I wanted it to be real organic.”

Indeed, 'organic' is a word that comes up a lot when talking to Clutch about the new record, Powell taking great care to get guitar tones right and making sure that each song had its own identity.

“Vance is all about vintage guitar sounds,” says guitarist Tim Sult. “I probably had more amplifier options than on any other album we've done. It was like going back to a music store in 1960! This was the first time I've ever recorded with amps from the '50s and I ended up buying a couple of '50s amps while we were in Nashville.”

“I felt really good about the gear that I was bringing into the studio,” concurs bassist Dan Maines, “but Vance had this 1974 Ampeg and I'm so glad that he recommended that. As soon as we plugged it in, it sounded like Sabbath! We ended up using it alongside one of my amps, and I loved it so much that once we were done recording I scoured the ads for another one. What I really like is that each song has a different tone to it, and I think that's Vance Powell's style.”

With each band member contributing riffs to the album – including Jean-Paul who has added mandolin to his repertoire – there was no shortage of material, each song road-tested long before it reached the studio. Hell, with 15 songs, “Book of Bad Decisions” could easily pass as a double album! Always wary of repeating themselves and retreading old ground, there is even – for the first time on a Clutch album – a horn section that swings like James Brown's pants!

“The third night I was watching the band,” says Vance, “they did this song that at that time was called Talkbox, which is now In Walks Barbarella. While Neil was singing, I was thinking to myself, “wow, there's a horn line here!” And while he was singing, I was humming it to myself. I brought it up to them, tenuously, and they were like, “okay, let's do it!” This is as Parliament, Funkadelic as it gets, maybe even a James Brown vibe!”

One thing, however, that is entirely as expected, is that as arguably the greatest rock lyricist of modern times, Fallon, as always, has provided some interesting subject matter, everything from poets to presidents and recipes to rock 'n' roll. You may have to Google some of it, because Fallon is nothing if not a clever bugger, and likes to keep his audience on their toes.

“Most of the time I have no idea what he's talking about,” laughs Jean-Paul, “but the lyrics completely inform how I'm going to play that tune. Whether or not I understand exactly what Neil is singing about is not important. I listen to the way Neil sings those words and I think about what those words mean to me, and that, ultimately, informs how I'm gonna play drums on that song.”

“I think I probably second guess myself into doing that,” says Neil of his lyrical style. “I would rather not be able to answer all the questions, just to keep it interesting for myself. Sometimes a rhyme sounds awesome and I don't know what it means, but I'll go with it anyway. It's become more difficult to write lyrics now that I have Wikipedia at my fingertips, because you can go down rabbit hole after rabbit hole and not get anything done! Not too long ago you'd have to spend months in a public library trying to find out the things you can find in a couple of keystrokes.”

Elsewhere, however, you'll find a more straightforward approach to lyrics, A Good Fire relating the memory of hearing Black Sabbath for the first time – something that everyone can relate to – while Sonic Counselor pays homage to Clutch fans. Indeed, it's fair to say that Clutch fans – collectively known as Gearheads – are a breed like no other.

“I've always loved rock songs that just celebrated rock 'n' roll,” grins Fallon, “but that song was a bit more about the people who come to our shows, that make it as exciting for us as hopefully it is for them. My favorite shows that I've seen bands do is like going to church, especially when everybody's in sync with each other and you walk out with your jaw on the floor. I feel incredibly grateful that people have walked out of our shows and felt the same way. It's a tip of the hat to them.”

“We're exceptionally lucky to have the fans we have,” Jean-Paul agrees. “They're diehard, and because of that, we take this that much more seriously. We do not take this for granted. We know that those folks could be anywhere else, and they've chosen to spend the evening at a Clutch show, so we're gonna do the best we can to provide them with the best musical experience we can. I think that translates to the records, because at the end of the day, all you have is your records. When this whole thing wraps up, those are gonna be the things that go down in history.”

Clutch are:

Neil Fallon – vocals & guitar
Jean-Paul Gaster – drums
Dan Maines – bass
Tim Sult – guitar
All That Remains
All That Remains
If you want to leave a lasting impression, get to the point...
Clinging to airtight songcraft, knifepoint precise metallic instrumentation, and stadium-size hard rock hooks, All That Remains cut right to the chase on their ninth fulllength album, Victim of the New Disease [Fearless Records]. In fact, the quintet—
Philip Labonte [lead vocals], Oli Herbert [lead guitar], Mike Martin [rhythm guitar],
Jason Costa [drums], and Aaron Patrick [bass, backing vocals]—perfect their patented
pummeling by wasting no time or energy at all.
“We just try to trim away all of the fat,” exclaims Labonte. “It’s easy for metal
bands, ourselves included, to get self-indulgent and write parts for the sake of parts.
Unless an idea makes a song better, there’s no reason to put it in. We always put the
song first. That’s how you stick with people. If you just write good songs, everything
else will be okay.”
That philosophy cemented the Massachusetts group as one of this century’s most consistent purveyors of heavy music with a bulletproof canon of arena-worthy anthems.
All That Remains’ discography is highlighted by Top 10 Active Rock radio hits such as
their first number one “Stand Up,” “Two Weeks,” “What If I Was Nothing,” and more.
Averaging 1 million monthly listeners on Spotify (an unprecedented feat for a metal
band in any era), cumulative sales eclipse 1 million albums worldwide. Not to mention, they’ve earned five consecutive Top 10 debuts on the Billboard Top Rock Albums
Chart and four in the Top 5. Most recently, 2017’s Madness spawned the smash cover
of Garth Brooks’ “The Thunder Rolls,” which trended on VEVO and generated 21 million plus total views and 8 million Spotify streams in under a year’s time. In addition
to packing houses as a headliner, they’ve practically burned down the stage everywhere from Rock on the Range to Welcome to Rockville.
When it came time to commence writing for what would become Victim of the New
Disease, the boys decided to go back to square one. All That Remains holed up in the
Chicopee, MA rehearsal space they’ve occupied since 2010 and dove into writing
alongside an old friend producer Dan “DL” Laskiewicz [Unearth, The Acacia Strain].
“We were trying to focus on what we do best,” the frontman continues. “We wanted
to be heavy. We didn’t want to go to L.A. and work on a record out there again like
we did with Madness. We wanted to do it where we were comfortable at home. That
method has always done really well for us. We got together in the old practice space
and hammered out riffs, ideas, and songs that resonated with us.”
For the first time, the band recorded proper demos complete with music and lyrics,
marking “the most striking difference” between previous releases. With “DL” behind
the board as producer and mixing courtesy of Josh Wilbur [Lamb of God, Gojira], they
delivered a striking, succinct, and sharp collection of ten anthems.
“We decided to throw a curveball,” grins Labonte. “...And do the the heaviest record
since For We Are Many in 2010! It was the perfect way to follow-up Madness where we
did some different styles and songs and even covered a country song. People might’ve
expected something more experimental, but throwing curveballs is what we do.”
All That Remains kick down the door on Victim of the New Disease with the deadly
barrage of opener “Fuck Love.” Chainsaw-sharp riffing and guttural growls roared as
the musicians make good on this heavy promise.
“We’ve started a few records with something that really kicks hard,” he goes on. “You
take your heaviest song and say, ‘This is how we’re going to set the tone for the rest
of the album. Here you go.’ ‘Fuck Love’ is the most aggressive song we’ve done in a
while. It’s burner. We dig beginning with a shocker.”
Meanwhile, the first single “Everything’s Wrong” hinges on an energetic groove that
builds towards an immediately chantable chorus still underscored by muscular double
bass.
“If we get a good hook, we like to make sure it’s maximally exposed,” says the singer.
“We want something you’ll hum later with lyrics you might be able to relate to. However, for the first time, we got to leave the double bass in!”
Then, there’s “Just Tell Me” [feat. Danny Worsnop]. On the hypnotic anthem, Labonte
locks into an unbreakable harmony with Worsnop, adding another dimension to the
record.
“We’ve been friends with Danny for a long time,” he continues. “We loved what he
did. He wanted to do something more chill, and I think he hit a homerun. If you’re
into rock ballad songs, you’ll appreciate it.”
Everything culminated on the visceral and vital “Victim of the New Disease,” which
hints at “how some ideas don’t work out—and continue not to work out, but we keep
trying them” over a fiery and focused four-on-the-floor riff.
In the end, All That Remains uncompromisingly tread the same path they’ve trodden
for nearly two decades and delivered a definitive body of work on the way
“This band is my life,” Labonte leaves off. “It’s twenty years of being a musician.
We’ve been able to weather some storms in the music industry, survive, and come out
thriving. We didn’t just ride a trend; we built a real career out of writing songs. We
don’t have a look or a gimmick. We have five dudes who write songs.” — Rick Florino,
September 2018
SHORT BIO
Since their formation in Massachusetts during 1998, All That Remains have built an
undeniable legacy upheld by airtight songcraft, knifepoint precise metallic instrumentation, and stadium-size hard rock hooks. As a result, they’ve outlasted trials, tribula-
tions, and trends to stand tall as as one of this century’s most consistent purveyors of
heavy music with a bulletproof canon of arena-worthy anthems. All That Remains’
discography is highlighted by success at Active Rock including radio hits in the top 10
such as “Two Weeks,” “What If I Was Nothing,” and their first number one “Stand
Up,”. Averaging 1 million monthly listeners on Spotify (an unprecedented feat for a
metal band in any era), while cumulative sales eclipse 1 million albums worldwide.
Not to mention, they’ve earned five consecutive Top 10 debuts on the Billboard Top
Rock Albums Chart and four in the Top 5. Most recently, 2017’s Madness spawned the
smash cover of Garth Brooks’ “The Thunder Rolls,” which trended on VEVO and generated 21 million plus total views and 8 million Spotify streams in under a year’s time.
In addition to packing houses as a headliner, they’ve practically burned down festival
stages everywhere from Rock on the Range to Welcome to Rockville.
In 2018, the quintet—Philip Labonte [lead vocals], Oli Herbert [lead guitar], Mike Martin [rhythm guitar], Jason Costa [drums], and Aaron Patrick [bass, backing vocals]—
perfect their patented pummeling by wasting no time or energy at all on their ninth
full-length album, Victim of the New Disease [Fearless Records]. — Rick Florino, September 2018
Led To Believe
Venue Information:
Palladium
261 Main Street
Worcester, MA, 01608